Boston Matchmaker



The best and brightest Boston singles turn to our professional matchmakers and dating coaches to find "the one" in Beantown.  

No matter where you live in or around Boston Harbor we have options for you. Massachusetts singles hailing from the campuses of Cambridge to Lexington, Belmont, Weston, Winchester, Stoneham, Waltham, Newton, Marblehead, Brookline, and Woburn hire us to sort through the misfits and meet likeminded singles.

There's no shortage of New England singles, but its a uniquely challenging part of the country to meet "the one". Our Boston matchmaking and date coaching is suitable for upscale singles seeking a meaningful relationship. 

To find love in Boston complete our Get Started form or call us toll free at (800) 734-9230


Heartcoach  Get Started


Complete our confidential Get Started form to be contacted by a representative so you can discuss your criteria and what we can do for you. Click this Get Started button to begin.

get startedGet Started

heartchat Background Checks


Speak with a coordinator to determine the right level of service for you. Each experience is customized to suit a client's needs and budget. Prices will be discussed on the call. To qualify for matchmaking you must prove your identity, verify your age and photos and pass a background check.

heartkey Personal
Coaching


To assist our clients in finding, forming and maintaining the ideal relationship we offer professional dating and relationship coaching as a complement to or substitute for matchmaking. You will meet your coach face-to-face to identify patterns, break habits, learn best practices and plan ahead.

Guaranteed*
Matches


We present your photos and profile to prospective matches and vice versa. We do our best to advocate for you and create interest. If you both accept the match we exchange numbers and expect you to get acquainted before you meet. Your feedback continuously improves the process.

The Virtues and Downsides of Online Dating

Thursday, February 06, 2020


The Virtues and Downsides of Online Dating
BY MONICA ANDERSON, EMILY A. VOGELS AND ERICA TURNER

30% of U.S. adults say they have used a dating site or app. A majority of online daters say their overall experience was positive, but many users – particularly younger women – report being harassed or sent explicit messages on these platforms.

From personal ads that began appearing in publications around the 1700s to videocassette dating services that sprang up decades ago, the platforms people use to seek out romantic partners have evolved throughout history. This evolution has continued with the rise of online dating sites and mobile apps.

Today, three-in-ten U.S. adults say they have ever used an online dating site or app – including 11% who have done so in the past year, according to a new Pew Research Center survey conducted Oct. 16 to 28, 2019. For some Americans, these platforms have been instrumental in forging meaningful connections: 12% say they have married or been in a committed relationship with someone they first met through a dating site or app. All in all, about a quarter of Americans (23%) say they have ever gone on a date with someone they first met through a dating site or app.

Previous Pew Research Center studies about online dating indicate that the share of Americans who have used these platforms – as well as the share who have found a spouse or partner through them – has risen over time. In 2013, 11% of U.S. adults said they had ever used a dating site or app, while just 3% reported that they had entered into a long-term relationship or marriage with someone they first met through online dating. It is important to note that there are some changes in question wording between the Center’s 2013 and 2019 surveys, as well as differences in how these surveys were fielded.1 Even so, it is clear that websites and mobile apps are playing a larger role in the dating environment than in previous years.2

The current survey finds that online dating is especially popular among certain groups – particularly younger adults and those who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB). Roughly half or more of 18- to 29-year-olds (48%) and LGB adults (55%) say they have ever used a dating site or app, while about 20% in each group say they have married or been in a committed relationship with someone they first met through these platforms. Americans who have used online dating offer a mixed look at their time on these platforms.

On a broad level, online dating users are more likely to describe their overall experience using these platforms in positive rather than negative terms. Additionally, majorities of online daters say it was at least somewhat easy for them to find others that they found physically attractive, shared common interests with, or who seemed like someone they would want to meet in person. But users also share some of the downsides to online dating. Roughly seven-in-ten online daters believe it is very common for those who use these platforms to lie to try to appear more desirable. And by a wide margin, Americans who have used a dating site or app in the past year say the experience left them feeling more frustrated (45%) than hopeful (28%).

Other incidents highlight how dating sites or apps can become a venue for bothersome or harassing behavior – especially for women under the age of 35. For example, 60% of female users ages 18 to 34 say someone on a dating site or app continued to contact them after they said they were not interested, while a similar share (57%) report being sent a sexually explicit message or image they didn’t ask for.

Online dating has not only disrupted more traditional ways of meeting romantic partners, its rise also comes at a time when norms and behaviors around marriage and cohabitation also are changing as more people delay marriage or choose to remain single.

These shifting realities have sparked a broader debate about the impact of online dating on romantic relationships in America. On one side, some highlight the ease and efficiency of using these platforms to search for dates, as well as the sites’ ability to expand users’ dating options beyond their traditional social circles. Others offer a less flattering narrative about online dating – ranging from concerns about scams or harassment to the belief that these platforms facilitate superficial relationships rather than meaningful ones. This survey finds that the public is somewhat ambivalent about the overall impact of online dating. Half of Americans believe dating sites and apps have had neither a positive nor negative effect on dating and relationships, while smaller shares think its effect has either been mostly positive (22%) or mostly negative (26%).

These findings come from a nationally representative survey of 4,860 U.S. adults conducted online Oct. 16 to 28, 2019, using Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel. The following are among the major findings.

This story continues where the article originally appeared on the Pew Research Center website February 6, 2020.

 

logos
*Our Guarantee. The information we provide regarding other individuals is reliable to the best of our knowledge. Everyone has their identity, age and photos verified and is subject to public record background checks. If information we provide is found to be inaccurate we discount the match and try again. We cannot guarantee or promise a certain outcome or result from matchmaking or coaching. Nothing we say or do can be construed as a guarantee about the outcome of your experience. Our past or future comments about the outcome of your experience, potential matches, estimates of fees and time frames or our opinions are not guarantees. Actual fees and time frames may vary from the estimates given.