Chicago Matchmaker



Our professional matchmakers have been matchmaking Chicagoland singles looking for love since 2009. If you live in places like Near North Side, Near South Side, Lincoln Park, Lakeview, Andersonville, Kenwood, Hyde Park, or Rogers Park its hard to meet your match while you’re just out and about.

Chicago singles beyond the city in places like Bridgeview, Lisle, Northlake, Summit, Midlothian, Matteson, Worth, West Chicago, Crete and Mokena have hired our professional matchmakers and personal coaches to meet the man or woman of their dreams.

Although it might be hard to sometimes to make it out and about in the Windy City there’s no shortage of outstanding singles surrounding you. Online and mobile dating often do more harm than good because they tend to be flooded with bad actors. We prove identity and age, run criminal background checks and personally interview people we represent face-to-face to ensure our clients have a safe and worry-free experience.

Complete our Get Started form or call us toll free at (800) 734-9230 for matchmaking services in Chicago. 



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Dating can be tough. With guaranteed matches and date feedback we do whatever it takes to guide you into a relationship.

Complete our Get Started form and you will be contacted to discuss your matchmaking and coaching options.

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 How It Works


Online dating is difficult. We guarantee matches that meet your criteria. Your personal coach and dedicated matchmakers will communicate feedback, troubleshoot issues and guide you into a relationship.

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Heartcoach About Us


Joann Ward has been matchmaking for over 30 years. Her son, Steve Ward followed in her footsteps in 2003. They became internationally known matchmakers as Hosts and Executive Producers of VH1 Tough Love

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Why Netflix Can Actually Be Good for Your Relationship

Tuesday, October 11, 2016


Why Netflix Can Actually Be Good for Your Relationship
Andrew Harrer—Bloomberg /Getty Image

It’s no relationship secret that having friends in common can improve a couple’s bond. But what if your social circles don’t overlap? Not to worry, says a team of psychologists from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada: Sharing Frank and Claire Underwood (or Ross and Rachel, or Jim and Pam) may work just as well.

For their recent study, the researchers had more than 250 students in relationships complete a series of questionnaires about their romantic bond and their habits; and then analyzed the results. Their findings, published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, suggest that enjoying TV shows, movies, and books together can boost the quality of a couple’s relationship—especially for partners who don’t share pals IRL.

In other words, that Netflix series you’re both obsessed with may actually be fanning your romantic flame. But, you may be thinking, isn’t that just because of all the extra hours spent cuddled up on the couch?

In an effort to rule out the possibility, the researchers controlled for the amount of time partners logged together. “We found that sharing media had an independent effect,” lead author Sarah Gomillion, PhD, told Health in an email.

Reading books and watching shows and flicks as a couple was associated with greater intimacy and confidence in the relationship—and the link was strongest for participants who had fewer mutual friends with their partners, the researchers found.

“Having a shared circle of friends can make couples feel closer and can even protect them from breaking up,” Gomillion explained to Health. But if that’s not the case, fictional characters seem to be a good substitute.

“Having a shared connection to the characters in a TV series or film might make couples feel like they share a social identity even if they lack mutual friends in the real world,” says Gomillion, who is a visiting scholar at the University of Texas at Austin. (At the time of the study, she was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.)

So while sitting in front of the TV for hours on end isn’t always a great idea, the occasional series binge may do you and yours some good. “People often say that activities like watching Netflix isolate us, but our research suggests that it can actually have important social benefits,” says Gomillion—like building your bond with your boo.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

 

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