Pennsylvania, New Jersey & Delaware Matchmaker



In 2002 Master Matchmakers was founded as Philadelphia's premier matchmaking service. Our staff of professional matchmakers is proud to have created countless successful matches throughout the Delaware Valley for more than 15 years. As native Philadelphians, our founders know how tough it is to find love in their home town. 

Greater Philadelphia singles in Bucks County, Chester County, Montgomery County or Delaware County, Germantown-Chestnut Hill, West Chester, King of Prussia, the Mainline or Center City continue to seek our assistance in meeting other like-minded, well-intentioned local area singles. We also represent outstanding men and women beyond the Lehigh Valley, including Northeastern, Central and Western Pennsylvania, North Jersey, South Jersey, Central Jersey, and Delaware too. 

Every potential match is assessed based on criteria that matters most to you. We conduct extensive interviews, prove age and identity, verify photos and run background checks on everyone we'll represent. You're also able to get acquainted with your matches over the phone before you meet. 

To find love in PA, NJ or DE complete our Get Started form or call (800) 734-9230.



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Dating can be tough. With guaranteed matches and date feedback we do whatever it takes to guide you into a relationship.

Complete our Get Started form and you will be contacted to discuss your matchmaking and coaching options.

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 How It Works


Online dating is difficult. We guarantee matches that meet your criteria. Your personal coach and dedicated matchmakers will communicate feedback, troubleshoot issues and guide you into a relationship.

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Heartcoach About Us


Joann Ward has been matchmaking for over 30 years. Her son, Steve Ward followed in her footsteps in 2003. They became internationally known matchmakers as Hosts and Executive Producers of VH1 Tough Love

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'Labor of Love': How dating and the work world grew up together

Saturday, December 24, 2016


'Labor of Love': How dating and the work world grew up together
Photo by Joni Sternbach

Moira Weigel, author of "Labor of Love," on the history of dating.

Labor of Love

The Invention of Dating

By Moira Weigel

Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 304 pp. $26

Reviewed by

Peter Lewis

There have always been rituals of courtship, and dating has its ever-evolving rites, training us, as Moira Weigel puts it in Labor of Love, "in how to be if we wanted to be wanted." But dating qua dating is unsupervised. So Weigel suggests we think of dating proper as starting around 1900, when women left domestic supervision to find work in the city.

There, in the pleasing urban paradox, one found privacy in public: dance halls, amusement parks, nickelodeons. Because of the wage and work gaps between the sexes, men were expected to pay, "to treat." This wasn't tawdry commerce. No money changed hands. This was romance, happiness, and desire. If sex was involved, what was new?

The "Calling Class" - the bourgeoisie, that is, who still needed supervision for their mating rituals - were predictably appalled. Some do-gooders hired private investigators to spy on this "dating" horror and report it to the vice commissions. Some warned that women who dated were on the road to "white slavery." But, no, they were working-class women who worked at jobs and worked to be datable.

Weigel leads us from penny arcades to soda fountains to serial monogamy to Tinder and OkCupid.com, and from "painted lady" to "making yourself up." We learn of the semiotics of a red bow tie, of "rent parties" to outfox Harlem's white slumlords, why the threat of nuclear obliteration is good for sex, why dating puts less stress on our moral valence than on our displays of culture and taste.

The high point is Weigel's parallel between two institutions: dating and the economy. This parallel is utterly absorbing and makes for such exotic bedfellows as Herbert Marcuse and Milton Friedman, each of whom, in different ways, "wanted to liberate individuals from all external restraints." You shop for a mate, you sell yourself, too. The workplace is dating's game board; it apportions time and money. The rich businessman tells the streetwalker in Pretty Woman that they do pretty much the same thing for money. That's the service economy for you. Saying "no" to work, as to a date, is tantamount to never being asked again.

Labor of Love is a cornucopian investigation, bright and critical, though at times with all the music of a graduate term paper. Weigel occasionally regurgitates source material wholesale, rather than shading it into the otherwise engrossing narrative. Above all, we're left with that fascinating connection between work world and dating world. Dating, like work, is transactional, and work is the bottom line for everyone.

This article originally appeared on Philly.com.

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